Where do you live?
Alameda
  • Alameda
  • Alpine
  • Amador
  • Butte
  • Calaveras
  • Colusa
  • Contra Costa
  • Del Norte
  • El Dorado
  • Fresno
  • Glenn
  • Humboldt
  • Imperial
  • Inyo
  • Kern
  • Kings
  • Lake
  • Lassen
  • Los Angeles
  • Madera
  • Marin
  • Mariposa
  • Mendocino
  • Merced
  • Modoc
  • Mono
  • Monterey
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  • Nevada
  • Orange
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  • Riverside
  • Sacramento
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  • Santa Barbara
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  • Santa Cruz
  • Shasta
  • Sierra
  • Siskiyou
  • Solano
  • Sonoma
  • Stanislaus
  • Sutter
  • Tehama
  • Trinity
  • Tulare
  • Tuolumne
  • Ventura
  • Yolo
  • Yuba
What do you care about?
Advancing Youth Justice
  • All Issue Areas
  • Advancing Youth Justice
  • Combatting Racial Disparities
  • Death Penalty
  • Ending Mass Incarceration
  • Ending Poverty Penalties and Money Bail
  • Ensuring, Accessibility, Transparency and Accountability
  • Protecting Immigrant Communities
  • Protecting Workers and Consumers
  • Reducing Gun Violence
  • Standing Up to Police Misconduct
  • Transparency and Accountability
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Alameda

DA Candidates

Recognizing that children and youth are categorically less culpable than adults, that they have less impulse control and that they possess profound capacity for transformation, will you decline to seek life without the possibility of parole for any person under 25 at the time of offense?

Will you commit to keeping all children out of adult court by pledging not to prosecute any minors as adults and by expanding the use of informal diversion and pre-filing diversion in juvenile cases?

Will you commit to keeping all children out of adult court by pledging not to prosecute any minors as adults and by expanding the use of informal diversion and pre-filing diversion in juvenile cases?
Pamela’s Response

A recent study by the Center On Juvenile and Criminal Justice, the Burns Institute, and the National Center for Youth Law found that between 2010-2016 in Alameda County, Black youth were 65 times more likely and Latino youth were 27 times more likely to be prosecuted as adults than White youth. Only systemic racism in the current DA’s decision-making process can explain those disturbing disparities. To eliminate this disparity in its totality, I pledge not to prosecute any youth under the age of 18 as an adult. Furthermore, I will implement policies to break the school to prison pipeline by significantly expanding restorative justice and other appropriate interventions. I will divert all youth facing misdemeanor charges into community based alternatives that can address their unmet social and emotional needs that are at the root of their behaviors through mentorship, and other positive youth development models. Lastly, I will look to implement a young adult court, similar to the one San Francisco DA’s officer has put into place, to help divert young people who are facing felony charges through intense case management, housing and employment assistance, and positive mentorship programs. As a former foster kid myself and a survivor of the juvenile justice system, I know that the resources used to criminalize, prosecute, and incarcerate young people will be better spent on educational and youth employment programs.

Recognizing that children and youth are categorically less culpable than adults, that they have less impulse control and that they possess profound capacity for transformation, will you decline to seek life without the possibility of parole for any person under 25 at the time of offense?
Pamela’s Response

The science on adolescent brain development is clear. Young people do not reach full brain development and decision-making capacity until their mid-twenties. As a result, given young people’s profound capacity for transformation and maturity, I pledge not to seek life without parole sentences for people under the age of 25 at the time of offense.

This site is a resource to help us understand the 88 district attorney candidates' stances on key criminal justice issues. We sent every DA candidate in California a set of questions about their platform. Their responses, or lack thereof, can help us be more informed voters on June 5th, 2018.

Why it matters

District Attorneys (DAs) have tremendous power to impact the lives of millions of people, their families, and entire communities. If someone is accused of a crime, it is the DA–not the police–who has the sole power to decide if criminal charges are filed and the severity of those charges. They alone decide who is deserving of a jail or prison sentence and who will instead be routed into a diversion program to help rebuild their life, or have charges dismissed.

In California, we have 58 elected DAs each representing one of our 58 counties. Our job is to elect a DA who is committed to seeking justice in criminal cases, working to prevent crime, and serving as a leader in the diverse communities they represent.

Learn more at MeetYourDA.org

The questionnaire contained:
23
“Yes” or “No” Questions
250
Word count response field

Who’s behind this?

Register to Vote
This website features candidate responses to the California District Attorney Candidate Questionnaire, a collaborative effort of the ACLU of California, Color Of Change, Faith In Action Fund, and Rock the Vote Action Fund. All DA candidates in the state were invited to respond ahead of the June 5, 2018 primary elections.